Men's 800m - Rabat Diamond League 2017


The Javelin's All-Time 300-Foot List

Considering only marks made with the current-specs men’s spear, there have been 37 performances over 300-feet (91.44) by 11 different performers in history.

WR holder Jan Železný has the most at 22.

Raymond Hecht checks in at 3.

Aki Parviainen, Thomas Röhler & latest club member Johannes Vetter claim 2 apiece.

Single-performance throwers: Steve Backley (who in ’92 became the first to crack the barrier), Kostas Gatsioúdis, Sergey Makarov, Tero Pitkämäki, Andreas Thorkildsen & Julius Yego 1.

The marks:


Vetter throws javelin 94.44m, second longest

Germany's Johannes Vetter produced the second longest javelin throw in history with a 94.44m effort in Lucerne on Tuesday.

Johanes Vetter’s 94.44m throw in the javelin stole the spotlight at the Spitzenleichtathletik meeting in Lucerne on Tuesday (11).

The mammoth effort elevated the 24-year-old German to the No. 2 position on the all-time list, supplanting compatriot Thomas Rohler, the Olympic champion, who threw 93.90m in Doha in early May.

Illustrating remarkable form, Vetter, who entered the competition with an 89.68m lifetime best, threw beyond the 90-metres barrier four times. He began on a tear, opening the competition with a personal best of 90.75m. He improved to 91.06m in the second round, further still to 93.06m in the third before breaching 94 metres with his 94.44m winning effort in the fourth, the fifth farthest throw of all-time. Only world record holder Jan Zelezny’s four best throws have sailed farther.

Still riding a high, Vetter ended the competition with another remarkable throw of 89.50m.

Rohler had to settle for second, reaching 89.45m in the fourth round followed by 88.47m in the fifth.

Vetter beat Rohler for the third time this month after winning the Paris Diamond League meeting with 88.74m and the German title in Erfurt with 89.35m. This year he had already thrown over 89 metres on two other occasions and twice more beyond 88 metres. Rohler has beaten Vetter five times in 2017 including the Diamond League meetings in Doha and Rome and at the IAAF World Challenge stop in Ostrava.

“I had a lot of adrenaline after the first two attempts,” Vetter said. “The first throw over 90 metres pushed me. I achieved my goal of this season and set the German record. I am without words. It’s incredible that I produced four throws over 90 metres two days after winning the German title.”

“The reason for German success is that we have a good team,” he continued. “We are good friends and we have good coaches. After the warm-up I expected to throw 90 metres but 94.44 in incredible. I need some days for it to sink it in. The javelin throw will be one of the greatest highlights of the World Championships in London.” But first comes a Diamond League stop in Monaco.

NELVIS HOLDS OFF PEARSON AND CASTLIN
Sharika Nelvis followed up her 100m hurdles win in Lausanne’s Diamond League meeting with another impressive win on Swiss soil clocking 12.67 (-1.2 m/s) beating 2012 Olympic champion Sally Pearson, who clocked 12.83 two days after her impressive runner-up finish in the Anniversary Games in London where she clocked 12.48. Olympic bronze medallist Kristi Castlin finished third with 12.88.

“I am happy with my performance as I did not know that there was negative wind,” said Nelvis, whose next stop will also be Monaco. “Running 12.67 in these conditions was pretty good. It was my second time in Lucerne and the crowd was amazing.”

Rio finalist Devon Allen completed a US double in the sprint hurdles winning the men’s 110m event in 13.31 ahead of African record holder Antonio Alkana of South Africa who clocked 13.34. Jarred Eaton was third in 13.38.

Lea Sprunger provided the highlight for the enthusiastic Swiss fans by winning the women’s 200m in 22.97 (-0.3 m/s) over Aaliyah Brown of the US by a scant 0.01. Another Swiss star Muijinga Kambundji was third in 23.05.

“I hoped to reach this consistency,” said Sprunger, who finished second in the 400m in Lausanne, clocking 54.29, just 0.04 shy of Anita Protti’s national record. “I had a good preparation with no injuries. Swiss athletics is very strong at the moment.”

Next on her schedule are stops in Rabat where she’ll run the 400m hurdles followed by a 400m race in Bellinzona.

Petra Fontanive scored the second Swiss win just a few minutes later by taking the 400m hurdles in 54.74 ahead of Rome and London Diamond League winner Janieve Russell who clocked 55.13. In the men’s race Quincy Downing of the US beat 2005 world champion Bershawn Jackson 48.85 to 49.40.

German Christin Hussong, the 2015 European U23, clinched her second javelin win in Lucerne with a 64.18m throw in the sixth attempt to overtake Kathryn Mitchell, who led with 61.44m since the second round.

Olga Mullina, who competes as a neutral athlete, cleared 4.55m on her third attempt and 4.62m at the second time of asking to win the women’s pole vault. She later bowed out with three tries at 4.71m. Local favourite Nicole Buchler finished second with 4.40m just two days after clearing a season’s best of 4.73m in London.

The sprint races were affected by head winds. Kelly Ann Baptiste from Trinidad and Tobago took the women’s A race in 11.16 (-0.7 m/s). Jamaican Ramona Burchell took the B race in 11.23 (-1.1 m/s).

In the men’s 100m, Michael Rodgers of the US and Jamaican Michael Campbell ran to a virtual dead heat, clocking 10.29, with Rodgers given the nod. Jamaica’s Tyquendo Tracey was faster in the B race, winning in 10.23.

Nickel Ashmeade won the 200m in 20.37, beating Warren Weir by 0.07.

Elsewhere on the track, world bronze medallist Amel Tuka from Bosnia and Hercegovina won the 800m in 1:46.74 from Erik Sowinski (1:47.06) of the US. Matthew Centrowitz, the Olympic 1500m champion, was a distant seventh in 1:49.12.

Christina Hering, who won the German national title last weekend, took the 800m in 2:01.31. Ethiopia’s Azmara Gebru held off Kenyan Caroline Kipkurui to take the women’s 3000m 8:52.63 to 8:53.36.

Farah set for one final double title blast

British athletics legend Mo Farah will hope he brings the curtain down on his track career with a third successive double world gold in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres in London in August.

The 34-year-old, who was named in both events in the British team selection unveiled on Tuesday, will compete on the track where he so memorably won double Olympic gold in 2012 when it was then the Olympic Stadium.

The host nation will be hoping a passionate home crowd will enable a relatively inexperienced team to at least match their 2015 world championship haul of seven medals.

arah -- who began his world gold medal haul with gold in the 5000 in 2011 and silver in the 10000 -- is the standout name with fellow 2012 Olympic champion Greg Rutherford the other proven champion in the squad.


Britain Announces Its World Championships Team

British Athletics has today announced a team of 78 athletes to compete at next month’s IAAF World Championships in London from 4-13 August 2017.

Reigning 5000m and 10,000m World Champion Mo Farah (coach: Alberto Salazar) headlines the team as he aims to defend both titles in the Olympic stadium next month. Farah, who has not been defeated in a 5000m or 10,000m race at a major championships since 2011, will be looking to pick up his fourth straight world title in the 5000m (2011, 2013 and 2015) and complete a hat-trick of 10,000m world titles, after taking gold in 2013 and 2015.

Also looking to achieve a double success on the track in London is Laura Muir (Andy Young). Muir qualified for the 1500m by winning last season’s Diamond League event and has shown sufficient form and fitness (after recovering from a stress fracture in her foot earlier this year) to also claim a place in the 5,000m.

Selected in both the heptathlon and high jump, Katarina Johnson-Thompson (Bertrand Valcin) will be another looking for success in two events. The 24-year-old from Liverpool broke her heptathlon personal best in Gotzis this May and is the current British recorder holder in the high jump.

Despite currently suffering from an ankle ligament injury, reigning long jump world champion Greg Rutherford (Dan Pfaff) has also been named in the squad. With just over three weeks to go until the start of the Championships, British Athletics is backing Rutherford in his race to be fit to compete in the stadium where he won Olympic gold in 2012. “Obviously this isn’t ideal,” Rutherford said this weekend. “But I am doing everything to give myself the best chance of success at the World Championships in London.”

Olympic bronze medallist from 2016, Sophie Hitchon (Tore Gustafsson) secured her place on the team after winning a fourth successive British title and will be joined in the hammer by 2015 world finalist Nick Miller (Gustafsson).

There is a welcome return to international action for Perri Shakes-Drayton (Chris Zah) in the 4x400m relay and Dina Asher-Smith (John Blackie) in the 200m and 4x100m relay. Asher-Smith, who won Olympic bronze in the 4x100m relay in 2016 and finished 5th in the 2015 200m world championships final, returned to action earlier this month after suffering fractured a bone in her right foot in February. Shakes-Drayton last represented British Athletics at the 2013 world championships, where she sustained a knee injury which has kept her out of international competition ever since.

European indoor hurdle champion Andrew Pozzi (Benke Blomkvist), sprinters CJ Ujah (Stuart McMillan) and Zharnel Hughes (Patrick Dawson) also make the team in the individual events, with Adam Gemili (Rana Reider) selected in the 4x100m relay squad.

Performance Director for British Athletics, Neil Black said: “This feels bigger for us than Rio. London 2017 is the major global sporting event this year and will be the biggest occasion the country has seen since 2012. We’ve selected some incredibly talented athletes, and in many events there have been some close calls. It’s now up to them to grasp this opportunity and produce performances that will make the whole nation proud.”

In the men’s marathon, Andrew Davies (Steve Vernon) has replaced Robbie Simpson who has withdrawn due to a calf injury.

In a move designed to empower athletes, those selected will vote to elect the British Athletics Team Captain at London 2017. Voting will commence tomorrow (12 July) with each athlete selected eligible to vote for anyone within the team. The Team Captain will be announced on 24 July.

In keeping with its philosophy of “selecting a large and competitive team to help inspire the next generation of British track and field stars” there will be a second and final selection meeting on the 24 July, where any events with unfilled places or available Home Nation slots will be discussed.

The British Athletics team for the 2017 IAAF World Championships in London:

MEN:
100m:
Reece Prescod (Jonas Tawiah-Dodoo)
James Dasaolu (Lloyd Cowan)
CJ Ujah (Stuart McMillan)

200m:
Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake (Dennis Shaver)
Danny Talbot (Benke Blomkvist)
Zharnel Hughes (Patrick Dawson)

400m:
Matt Hudson-Smith (Tony Hadley)
Dwayne Cowan (Lloyd Cowan)
Martyn Rooney (Graham Hedman)

800m: 
Elliot Giles (Jon Bigg)
Guy Learmonth (Henry Gray)
Kyle Langford (Jon Bigg)

1500m:
Chris O’Hare (Terrence Mahon)
Josh Kerr (Joe Franklin)
Jake Wightman (Geoff Wightman)

5000m: 
Mo Farah (Alberto Salazar)
Andrew Butchart (Derek Easton)

10,000m:
Mo Farah (Alberto Salazar)

3000m steeplechase:
Rob Mullett (Andrew and Amy Begley)
Zak Seddon (Jeff Seddon)

110m hurdles: 
Andrew Pozzi (Benke Blomkvist)
David King (James Hillier)
David Omoregie (Benke Blomkvist)

400m hurdles:
Jack Green (self-coached)

High Jump: 
Robbie Grabarz (Fuzz Caan)

Long Jump: 
Greg Rutherford (Dan Pfaff)

Triple Jump:
Nathan Fox (Tosin Oke)

Hammer:
Nick Miller (Tore Gustafsson)

Decathlon:
Ashley Bryant (Aston Moore)

20km Race Walk:
Tom Bosworth (Andi Drake)
Callum Wilkinson (Andi Drake)

50km Race Walk:
Dominic King (George Nibre)

Marathon Men:
Callum Hawkins (coach: Robert Hawkins)
Josh Griffiths (self-coached)
Andrew Davies (Steve Vernon)

4x100m relay:
CJ Ujah (Stuart McMillan)
Nethaneel Mitchell-Blake (Dennis Shaver)
Danny Talbot (Benke Blomkvist)
Zharnel Hughes (Patrick Dawson)
Adam Gemili (Rana Reider)
Harry Aikines-Aryeetey (Benke Blomkvist)
Richard Kilty (Kevin Kilty)
Reece Prescod (Jonas Tawiah-Dodoo)

4x400m relay:
Matt Hudson-Smith (Tony Hadley)
Dwayne Cowan (Lloyd Cowan)
Martyn Rooney (Graham Hedman)
Delano Williams (Neil Harrison)
Rabah Yousif (Carol Williams)
Jack Green (self-coached)
Cameron Chalmers (James Hillier)

WOMEN:
100m:
Asha Philip (Steve Fudge)
Daryll Neita (Jonas Tawiah-Dodoo)
Desiree Henry (Rana Reider)

200m:
Shannon Hylton (Ryan Freckleton)
Bianca Williams (Lloyd Cowan)
Dina Asher-Smith (John Blackie)

400m: 
Zoey Clark (Eddie McKenna)
Emily Diamond (Jared Deacon)
Anyika Onuora (Rana Reider)

800m:
Shelayna Oskan-Clarke (Jon Bigg)
Adelle Tracey (Craig Winrow)
Lynsey Sharp (Terrence Mahon)

1500m:
Laura Muir (Andy Young)
Laura Weightman (Steve Cram)
Jessica Judd (Mick Judd)
Sarah McDonald (David Harmer)

5000m:
Steph Twell (Mick Woods)
Eilish McColgan (Liz McColgan-Nuttall)
Laura Muir (Andy Young)

10,000m:
Beth Potter (Mick Woods)
Jessica Martin (Josep Carballude)
Charlotte Taylor (Helen Lehman-Winters)

3000m steeplechase:
Rosie Clarke (David Harmer)

100m hurdles:
Tiffany Porter (Jeff Porter)

400m hurdles:
Eilidh Doyle (Brian Doyle)

High Jump:
Morgan Lake (Fuzz Caan)
Katarina Johnson-Thompson (Bertrand Valcin)

Pole Vault:
Holly Bradshaw (Scott Simpson)

Long Jump:
Lorraine Ugen (Shawn Jackson)

Discus:
Jade Lally (Andrew Neal)

Hammer:
Sophie Hitchon (Tore Gustafsson)

Heptathlon:
Katarina Johnson-Thompson (Bertrand Valcin)

20km Race Walk:
Gemma Bridge (Mark Wall)
Bethan Davies (Andi Drake)

Marathon Women:
Alyson Dixon (self-coached)
Charlotte Purdue (Nic Bideau)
Tracy Barlow (Nick Anderson)

4x100m relay:
Asha Philip (Steve Fudge)
Daryll Neita (Jonas Tawiah-Dodoo)
Desiree Henry (Rana Reider)
Dina Asher-Smith (John Blackie)
Shannon Hylton (Ryan Frekleton)
Bianca Williams (Lloyd Cowan)
Corinne Humphreys (Darren Braithwaite)

4x400m:
Zoey Clark (Eddie McKenna)
Emily Diamond (Jared Deacon)
Anyika Onuora (Rana Reider)
Eilidh Doyle (Brian Doyle)
Laviai Nielsen (Frank Adams)
Perri Shakes-Drayton (Chris Zah)